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The UK 2013 NAP states in the section on The existing UK legal and policy framework that [page 8]:

“Legislation has also been passed to plug specific gaps in the protection of workers under the law such as the Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004, which created an agency to prevent the exploitation of workers in agricultural work, shellfish-gathering and related processing or packaging.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP refers to the workers’ rights in the Introduction [page 3]:

“Since the publication of the UNGPs, in 2011, and the UK’s National Action Plan in 2013, there have been a number of developments at the international level. In particular: (…) protect labour rights, promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment (SDG 8.8).”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP states in the section The State’s Duty to Protect Human Rights that [page 7]:

“Legislation has also been passed to plug specific gaps in the protection of workers under the law such as the Gangmasters (Licensing) Act 2004, which created an agency to prevent the exploitation of workers in agricultural work, shellfish-gathering and related processing or packaging.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP refers to migrant workers’ rights also in Government Commitments section [page 11]:

“The Government will do the following to reinforce its implementation of its commitments under Pillar 1 of the UNGPs: (…) Consider new project activity on raising awareness and tackling the negative impacts of business activity, including on the human rights of groups like indigenous peoples, women, national or ethnic minorities, religious and linguistic minorities, children, persons with disabilities, and migrant workers and their families, by tasking our diplomatic missions in countries where these are concerns.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP includes a Case study of Rana Plaza which makes reference to workers’ rights [page 12]:

”DFID Bangladesh funding has also worked to try and ensure justice for garment workers, supporting a number of NGOs to file public interest litigation to protect workers’ rights, and increase awareness of worker rights. To support this, in 2015 the British High Commission began work with Global Rights Compliance and Action Aid Bangladesh to increase state, corporate, trade associations and trade union understanding and uptake of the UN Guiding Principles, increase accountability and reduce human rights violations in the garment, leather and tannery sectors.”

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