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This website is an online “one stop shop” for information regarding the development of National Action Plans (NAPs) on Business and Human Rights. It is managed by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR).

What are National Action Plans (NAPs)?

NAPs are policy documents in which a government articulates priorities and actions that it will adopt to support the implementation of international, regional, or national obligations and commitments with regard to a given policy area or topic.

The UN Working Group on human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises (UNWG), mandated by the Human Rights Council to promote the effective and comprehensive implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), noted in its 2016 Guidance on business and human rights NAPs that they can be an important means to promote the implementation of the UNGPs.

Where do NAPs come from?

NAPs are not unique to the topic of business and human rights. Many governments have developed and adopted NAPs on various policy areas or topics, including but not limited to: human rights, development, corporate social responsibility, women’s rights, peace and security, children’s rights, climate change, renewable energy, cyber-security, and open government.

The UN Human Rights Council unanimously endorsed the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) in 2011. Since then, the international community has converged on the UNGPs as a framework for preventing, addressing, and remediating business-related human rights abuses and on the need for states to adopt NAPs to promote implementation of business and human rights frameworks, including the UNGPs.

The UN Human Rights Council, European Union (EU) bodies, the Council of Europe, individual governments, civil society groups, national human rights institutions (NHRIs), and business associations have issued formal statements calling for governments to develop NAPs. At the inter-American level, the OAS has called on its Member States to implement the UNGPs.

What are some of the benefits of NAPs?

The development of a NAP presents a government with the opportunity to review the extent of its implementation of business and human rights frameworks, including the UNGPs, at the national level and then to identify gaps and reforms to increase coherence with the government’s human rights commitments across business-related legal and policy frameworks and programs. If undertaken in an inclusive, transparent, and participatory manner, the process of developing a NAP can also be a catalyst for establishing multi-stakeholder coalitions supportive of progress on business and human rights, as well as with regard to the achievement of broader agendas, such as the recently concluded Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Questions or comments?

For more information, feedback or for a request regarding this website, please contact Daniel Morris at the DIHR - damo (@) humanrights.dk

Acknowledgments

DIHR would like to acknowledge the following organisations and individuals for their critical contributions to this website:

  • Sida and DANIDA for their financial support to the project
  • The International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR) for its long term partnership with DIHR on developing tools and guidance on NAPs
  • The Polish Institute for Human Rights and Business and Sustentia for developing some of the website content
  • All the individuals from civil society organisations, NHRIs, governments who kindly reviewed the content.

Responsibility for any errors present lies with the DIHR. We would appreciate these being brought to our attention.

Stakeholders

Multiple actors may find particular value in this website:

  • Government officials and elected representatives may use this website to, for example, orient domestic policy-making, including at the local and sub-national levels; inform positions taken in international institutions or standard-setting processes; and support alignment between NAPs and other national plans and inform capacity-building efforts at all levels of government.
  • National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) may use this website to undertake NBAs on business and human rights on their own accord or on request from their government. This website will also be helpful to NHRIs where they act as conveners of NAPs development processes, including NAP stakeholder committees. Information contained within this website can further be utilised by NHRIs to inform monitoring, investigations, education, and reporting activities linked to business and human rights issues, in line with their UN Paris Principles mandates.
  • Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) may use this website to inform the standard of a NAP process or to help in the creation of shadow NBAs to monitor and evaluate state commitments and progress in implementing the UNGPs, thereby supporting advocacy and dialogue with states and businesses. They can also use this website when preparing reports and submissions to national, regional, or international supervisory bodies on topics relevant to business and human rights.
  • Businesses may utilise this website to inform themselves about measures that can be expected of states in implementing the UNGPs, thereby preparing themselves for participation in NAP development processes.
  • Multilateral and bilateral development agencies may find this website useful when assessing baseline conditions and in designing and monitoring programmes and projects.
  • Media, researchers, and academia can use this website to help orient investigations, analysis, research, and reporting on government responses to the UNGPs, corporate accountability, and sustainable development more broadly.

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