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The UK 2013 NAP in the section on The existing UK legal and policy framework states [page 9]:

“The Government exercises controls on the export of “strategic” goods and technology through the export licensing system. All export licence applications are rigorously assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria. These assessments take full account of possible human rights impacts; a licence would not be granted if we judge there is a clear risk that the proposed export might be used for internal repression.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP notes in The existing UK legal and policy framework that [page 6]:

“The UNGPs set out the general regulatory and policy measures a state may take in order to fulfil their duty to protect against human rights violations by third parties, including business enterprises. They recommend that states should:

  • Encourage, or require, business enterprises to communicate their work to address human rights impacts;”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP further notes in The existing UK legal and policy framework that [page 8]:

“The Government exercises controls on the export of “strategic” goods and technology through the export licensing system. All export licence applications are rigorously assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria. These assessments take full account of possible human rights impacts; a licence would not be granted if we judge there is a clear risk that the proposed export might be used for internal repression.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP, in the section devoted to The state’s duty to protect human rights: The existing UK legal and policy framework mentions the impact assessment with regards to controls on the export highlights that [page 8]:

“The Government exercises controls on the export of “strategic” goods and technology through the export licensing system. All export license applications are rigorously assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria. These assessments take full account of possible human rights impacts; a license would not be granted if we judge there is a clear risk that the proposed export might be used for internal repression.”

The UK 2016 Updated NAP makes a reference to impact assessment in Government Commitments section while discussing UNGPs Reporting Framework and Unilever human rights report [page 17]:

“The Commission is working in partnership with the Financial Reporting Council and Shift to publish guidance early in 2016 to help company boards to understand what they are expected to know, do and say about human rights. It will provide company boards with smart questions to ask of the business, help them to understand how human rights risks align with business risk, and bring clarity and coherence to different human rights reporting requirements. The Commission is working with the Institute of Human Rights and Business to publish guidance in early 2016 for UK businesses in the care and private security sectors. The guidance will include an assessment of the main human rights impacts in each sector and practical guidance for managers in areas such as human resources, operational delivery and procurement.”

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