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Slovenia – Workers’ rights

Slovenia’s Priorities

Promotion and protection of fundamental workers’ rights, also in transnational businesses and along the entire production chain. (pg. 6)

The state’s expectations of business enterprises

Enterprises must respect and protect internationally recognised human rights as defined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and fundamental rights, as stipulated in the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. (pg. 7)

enterprises are encouraged to act in compliance with the UN Guiding Principles, the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, and to report according to ISO 26000 and GRI standards. (pg. 7)

Principle 2 – States sets expectation for respecting human rights

In Slovenia, economic operators are expected to proactively ensure human rights protection throughout their business operations in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles, the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy. (pg. 11)

Principle 3a – Precarious Work

The Employment Relationship Act contains several provisions to that effect, including a provision in accordance with EU regulations (Council Directive concerning the framework agreement on fixed-term work) and the ILO Convention concerning Part-Time Work No. 175, which stipulates that both a fixed-term and a part-time employment contract must provide for full legal and social security benefits. (pg. 12-13)

Principle 3a –  Workplace mobbing [bullying]

In accordance with the Employment Relationship Act, the employer is obliged to provide a working environment in which no worker is subject to sexual or other harassment or mobbing, either verbal, non-verbal or physical, by the employer, superiors or co-workers. The Employment Relationship Act stipulates fines for violations of these obligations by the employer. (pg. 13)

Principle 9 – Adequate Domestic Policy

The latest trade agreements contain sustainable development provisions, which require that the signatories respect workers’ rights by acceding to ILO conventions… (pg. 30)

Principle 26 – Access to assistance

The amended Criminal Code, which entered into force on 2 July 2017, stipulates that no direct intent needs to be determined in the event of the criminal offence of violation of fundamental workers’ rights, and that conditional intent suffices; the foreseen penalties are also higher. (pg. 36-37)

Workers in an employment relationship are guaranteed direct legal protection in the event of a request to determine the grounds for the illegal termination of an employment contract, other modes of termination of employment contract or decisions regarding the disciplinary responsibility of workers. In addition, workers may bring monetary claims arising from the employment relationship before the competent labour court. (pg. 37)

In the event of bullying or discrimination, workers have the right to judicial protection. (pg. 37)

Workers can appeal to the Labour Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia. If a labour inspector, based on a report or inspection, determines a violation of the prohibition of bullying, appropriate measures or sanctions may be imposed on the employer. (pg. 38)

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