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Italy

C. National Priorities

[page 7]

…With the aim of analysing specific matters related to the Italian context, the NAP mainly focuses on six priorities representing the business and human rights areas that NAP intends to address….

  1. PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS DUE DILIGENCE PROCESSES, AIMED AT IDENTIFY, PREVENT AND MITIGATE THE POTENTIAL RISKS, WITH PARTICULAR FOCUS ON SMEs;…

III. Government’s Expectations Towards Business

[page 9]

… According to the ‘Responsibility to Respect’, in order to prevent and avoid negative human rights impacts enterprises have to conduct processes aimed at preventing the risk of causing (or contributing to adverse human rights impact and at adopting specific measures able to mitigate eventual harmful consequences. Companies are thus expected to:… ii) set up and implement due diligence processes to identify, assess and prevent any potential human rights risks, which could be incurred in across their operations and activities (or business partners or suppliers)…

RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS CONDUCT AND OECD DUE DILIGENCE PRACTICES

[page 17]

With reference to the promotion of responsible business conduct, the Italian OECD NCP is committed to implement the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises by promoting them through an in-depth dialogue with businesses, trade unions, non-governmental organizations, representatives of civil society. Since the 2011 review of the OECD Guidelines, the NCP developed tools to make international standards operational especially for SMEs such as the “Due Diligence Guidance for SMEs” and activities for awareness raising and pilot projects involving large companies and SMEs with the aim of spurring a proactive responsible supply chain management through training, information and assistance …

Planned Measures

[page 19]

  • Promote common understanding of due diligence among companies and strongly encourage companies to engage in human rights policy and due diligence processes involving the entire supply chain …
  • Participate to initiatives in the context of the OECD, EU and other international fora on sustainable supply chains, human rights and due diligence.

Planned Measures

[page 22]

  • Within the framework of the monitoring mechanism set in the Plan (see par. V) give special attention to due diligence of business enterprises owned or controlled by the State

Planned Measures

[page 23]

  • Further promote the knowledge of the OECD due diligence guidance ‘Risk Awareness Tool for Multinational Enterprises in Weak Governance Zones’ and ‘Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas’, encouraging and supporting SMEs to follow as well this guidance tools.

Italy’s Updated NAP

III. ITALY’S EXPECTATIONS TOWARDS BUSINESS

(page 8)

In 2017 EU passed the new Regulation (EU) 2017/821 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2017 laying down supply chain due diligence obligations for Union importers of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating from conflict-affected and high-risk areas. The Regulation meets the EU countries commitments to breaking the link between armed conflicts, crimes and illegal exploitation of minerals which often implies serious human rights abuses. EU companies in the supply chain are required to adopt due diligence to ensure they import these minerals and metals from responsible and conflict-free sources only. The new Regulation will take effect on 1 January 2021.

PLANNED MEASURES

(page 25)

  1. Introduction of specific courses on due diligence and children rights to be included in the training programmes for officials of public administration.
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